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Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 33: Virus-Host Gene Interactions Define HIV-1 Disease Progression
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Virus-Host Gene Interactions Define HIV-1 Disease Progression
Chapter number 33
Book title
Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Published in
Current topics in microbiology and immunology, June 2017
DOI 10.1007/82_2017_33
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-961803-6, 978-3-31-961804-3
Authors

Monaco, Daniela C., Ende, Zachary, Hunter, Eric, Daniela C. Monaco, Zachary Ende, Eric Hunter

Abstract

In this chapter, we will review recent research on the virology of HIV-1 transmission and the impact of the transmitted virus genotype on subsequent disease progression. In most instances of HIV-1 sexual transmission, a single genetic variant, or a very limited number of variants from the diverse viral quasi-species present in the transmitting partner establishes systemic infection. Transmission involves both stochastic and selective processes, such that in general a minority variant in the donor is transmitted. While there is clear evidence for selection, the biological properties that mediate transmission remain incompletely defined. Nevertheless, the genotype of the transmitted founder virus, which reflects prior exposure to and escape from host immune responses, clearly influences disease progression. Some escape mutations impact replicative capacity, while others effectively cloak the virus from the newly infected host's immune response by preventing recognition. It is the balance between the impact of escape mutations on viral fitness and susceptibility to the host immunogenetics that defines HIV-1 disease progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 29%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 5 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,728,824
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#333
of 599 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,689
of 273,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 599 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,363 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them