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Viruses, Genes, and Cancer

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 4: MYC and RAF: Key Effectors in Cellular Signaling and Major Drivers in Human Cancer
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

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Citations

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41 Mendeley
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Chapter title
MYC and RAF: Key Effectors in Cellular Signaling and Major Drivers in Human Cancer
Chapter number 4
Book title
Viruses, Genes, and Cancer
Published in
Current topics in microbiology and immunology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/82_2017_4
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-961803-6, 978-3-31-961804-3
Authors

Eduard Stefan, Klaus Bister

Abstract

The prototypes of the human MYC and RAF gene families are orthologs of animal proto-oncogenes that were originally identified as transduced alleles in the genomes of highly oncogenic retroviruses. MYC and RAF genes are now established as key regulatory elements in normal cellular physiology, but also as major cancer driver genes. Although the predominantly nuclear MYC proteins and the cytoplasmic RAF proteins have different biochemical functions, they are functionally linked in pivotal signaling cascades and circuits. The MYC protein is a transcription factor and together with its dimerization partner MAX holds a central position in a regulatory network of bHLH-LZ proteins. MYC regulates transcription conducted by all RNA polymerases and controls virtually the entire transcriptome. Fundamental cellular processes including distinct catabolic and anabolic branches of metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, stem cell regulation, and apoptosis are under MYC control. Deregulation of MYC expression by rearrangement or amplification of the MYC locus or by defects in kinase-mediated upstream signaling, accompanied by loss of apoptotic checkpoints, leads to tumorigenesis and is a hallmark of most human cancers. The critically controlled serine/threonine RAF kinases are central nodes of the cytoplasmic MAPK signaling cascade transducing converted extracellular signals to the nucleus for reshaping transcription factor controlled gene expression profiles. Specific mutations of RAF kinases, such as the prevalent BRAF(V600E) mutation in melanoma, or defects in upstream signaling or feedback loops cause decoupled kinase activities which lead to tumorigenesis. Different strategies for pharmacological interference with MYC- or RAF-induced tumorigenesis are being developed and several RAF kinase inhibitors are already in clinical use.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 24%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 16 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Chemistry 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 16 39%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2017.
All research outputs
#14,488,164
of 25,200,621 outputs
Outputs from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#367
of 716 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215,234
of 432,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#18
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,200,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 716 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 432,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.