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Yeast Membrane Transport

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 3: Yeast Membrane Transport
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1 tweeter

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Yeast Membrane Transport
Chapter number 3
Book title
Yeast Membrane Transport
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-25304-6_3
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-925302-2, 978-3-31-925304-6
Authors

Kane, Patricia M, Patricia M. Kane

Abstract

Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Norway 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 22%
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 31%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Engineering 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,628,164
of 7,659,635 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#1,660
of 2,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,893
of 266,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#16
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,659,635 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,205 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.