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Yeast Membrane Transport

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 6: Sugar and Glycerol Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Sugar and Glycerol Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Chapter number 6
Book title
Yeast Membrane Transport
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-25304-6_6
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-925302-2, 978-3-31-925304-6
Authors

Bisson, Linda F, Fan, Qingwen, Walker, Gordon A, Linda F. Bisson, Qingwen Fan, Gordon A. Walker, Bisson, Linda F., Walker, Gordon A.

Abstract

In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the process of transport of sugar substrates into the cell comprises a complex network of transporters and interacting regulatory mechanisms. Members of the large family of hexose (HXT) transporters display uptake efficiencies consistent with their environmental expression and play physiological roles in addition to feeding the glycolytic pathway. Multiple glucose-inducing and glucose-independent mechanisms serve to regulate expression of the sugar transporters in yeast assuring that expression levels and transporter activity are coordinated with cellular metabolism and energy needs. The expression of sugar transport activity is modulated by other nutritional and environmental factors that may override glucose-generated signals. Transporter expression and activity is regulated transcriptionally, post-transcriptionally and post-translationally. Recent studies have expanded upon this suite of regulatory mechanisms to include transcriptional expression fine tuning mediated by antisense RNA and prion-based regulation of transcription. Much remains to be learned about cell biology from the continued analysis of this dynamic process of substrate acquisition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Master 8 13%
Professor 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 29%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Engineering 2 3%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 9 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2016.
All research outputs
#16,168,957
of 20,828,611 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#2,633
of 4,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#267,240
of 398,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#385
of 700 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,828,611 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,636 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 398,498 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 700 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.