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Long Non Coding RNA Biology

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 1: History, Discovery, and Classification of lncRNAs
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 X users
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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32 Dimensions

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mendeley
363 Mendeley
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Chapter title
History, Discovery, and Classification of lncRNAs
Chapter number 1
Book title
Long Non Coding RNA Biology
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-5203-3_1
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-9-81-105202-6, 978-9-81-105203-3
Authors

Julien Jarroux, Antonin Morillon, Marina Pinskaya, Jarroux, Julien, Morillon, Antonin, Pinskaya, Marina

Abstract

The RNA World Hypothesis suggests that prebiotic life revolved around RNA instead of DNA and proteins. Although modern cells have changed significantly in 4 billion years, RNA has maintained its central role in cell biology. Since the discovery of DNA at the end of the nineteenth century, RNA has been extensively studied. Many discoveries such as housekeeping RNAs (rRNA, tRNA, etc.) supported the messenger RNA model that is the pillar of the central dogma of molecular biology, which was first devised in the late 1950s. Thirty years later, the first regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) were initially identified in bacteria and then in most eukaryotic organisms. A few long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) such as H19 and Xist were characterized in the pre-genomic era but remained exceptions until the early 2000s. Indeed, when the sequence of the human genome was published in 2001, studies showed that only about 1.2% encodes proteins, the rest being deemed "non-coding." It was later shown that the genome is pervasively transcribed into many ncRNAs, but their functionality remained controversial. Since then, regulatory lncRNAs have been characterized in many species and were shown to be involved in processes such as development and pathologies, revealing a new layer of regulation in eukaryotic cells. This newly found focus on lncRNAs, together with the advent of high-throughput sequencing, was accompanied by the rapid discovery of many novel transcripts which were further characterized and classified according to specific transcript traits.In this review, we will discuss the many discoveries that led to the study of lncRNAs, from Friedrich Miescher's "nuclein" in 1869 to the elucidation of the human genome and transcriptome in the early 2000s. We will then focus on the biological relevance during lncRNA evolution and describe their basic features as genes and transcripts. Finally, we will present a non-exhaustive catalogue of lncRNA classes, thus illustrating the vast complexity of eukaryotic transcriptomes.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 363 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 363 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 16%
Student > Master 37 10%
Student > Bachelor 37 10%
Researcher 28 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 6%
Other 40 11%
Unknown 144 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 112 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 3%
Chemistry 6 2%
Other 34 9%
Unknown 150 41%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2023.
All research outputs
#1,605,161
of 23,575,882 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#202
of 5,024 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,894
of 423,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#21
of 489 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,575,882 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,024 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 423,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 489 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.