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Long Non Coding RNA Biology

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 4: Long Noncoding RNAs in the Yeast S. cerevisiae
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

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1 blog
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3 X users

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48 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Long Noncoding RNAs in the Yeast S. cerevisiae
Chapter number 4
Book title
Long Non Coding RNA Biology
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-5203-3_4
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-9-81-105202-6, 978-9-81-105203-3
Authors

Rachel O. Niederer, Evan P. Hass, David C. Zappulla

Abstract

Long noncoding RNAs have recently been discovered to comprise a sizeable fraction of the RNA World. The scope of their functions, physical organization, and disease relevance remain in the early stages of characterization. Although many thousands of lncRNA transcripts recently have been found to emanate from the expansive DNA between protein-coding genes in animals, there are also hundreds that have been found in simple eukaryotes. Furthermore, lncRNAs have been found in the bacterial and archaeal branches of the tree of life, suggesting they are ubiquitous. In this chapter, we focus primarily on what has been learned so far about lncRNAs from the greatly studied single-celled eukaryote, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most lncRNAs examined in yeast have been implicated in transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes-often in response to forms of stress-whereas a select few have been ascribed yet other functions. Of those known to be involved in transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes, the vast majority function in cis. There are also some yeast lncRNAs identified that are not directly involved in regulation of transcription. Examples of these include the telomerase RNA and telomere-encoded transcripts. In addition to its role as a template-encoding telomeric DNA synthesis, telomerase RNA has been shown to function as a flexible scaffold for protein subunits of the RNP holoenzyme. The flexible scaffold model provides a specific mechanistic paradigm that is likely to apply to many other lncRNAs that assemble and orchestrate large RNP complexes, even in humans. Looking to the future, it is clear that considerable fundamental knowledge remains to be obtained about the architecture and functions of lncRNAs. Using genetically tractable unicellular model organisms should facilitate lncRNA characterization. The acquired basic knowledge will ultimately translate to better understanding of the growing list of lncRNAs linked to human maladies.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Master 5 10%
Professor 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 12 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,072,192
of 22,997,544 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#502
of 4,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,227
of 421,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#40
of 490 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,997,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,960 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 490 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.