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Long Non Coding RNA Biology

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 6: Long Noncoding RNAs in Mammalian Development and Diseases
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

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1 blog
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3 X users

Citations

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39 Dimensions

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16 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Long Noncoding RNAs in Mammalian Development and Diseases
Chapter number 6
Book title
Long Non Coding RNA Biology
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-5203-3_6
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-9-81-105202-6, 978-9-81-105203-3
Authors

Parna Saha, Shreekant Verma, Rashmi U. Pathak, Rakesh K. Mishra

Abstract

Following analysis of sequenced genomes and transcriptome of many eukaryotes, it is evident that virtually all protein-coding genes have already been discovered. These advances have highlighted an intriguing paradox whereby the relative amount of protein-coding sequences remain constant but nonprotein-coding sequences increase consistently in parallel to increasing evolutionary complexity. It is established that differences between species map to nonprotein-coding regions of the genome that surprisingly is transcribed extensively. These transcripts regulate epigenetic processes and constitute an important layer of regulatory information essential for organismal development and play a causative role in diseases. The noncoding RNA-directed regulatory circuit controls complex characteristics. Sequence variations in noncoding RNAs influence evolution, quantitative traits, and disease susceptibility. This chapter presents an account on a class of such noncoding transcripts that are longer than 200 nucleotides (long noncoding RNA-lncRNA) in mammalian development and diseases.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 31%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Professor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 50%
Neuroscience 3 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Unknown 3 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,217,762
of 22,997,544 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#546
of 4,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,575
of 421,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#47
of 490 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,997,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,960 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 490 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.