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Avian Reproduction

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 11: Sperm Storage in the Female Reproductive Tract: A Conserved Reproductive Strategy for Better Fertilization Success
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

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Chapter title
Sperm Storage in the Female Reproductive Tract: A Conserved Reproductive Strategy for Better Fertilization Success
Chapter number 11
Book title
Avian Reproduction
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-3975-1_11
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-9-81-103974-4, 978-9-81-103975-1
Authors

Mei Matsuzaki, Tomohiro Sasanami, Matsuzaki, Mei, Sasanami, Tomohiro

Abstract

In internal fertilizers including mammals, fertilization success depends on the timely arrival of sperm and egg at the site of fertilization. Males should transfer their spermatozoa to the female reproductive tract by copulation during or prior to ovulation in order to achieve this aim. However, such a collaborative mating behavior is often disconnected from the efficiency of the sperm-egg encounter, i.e., ovulation by females occurs independently from insemination by males in many species. To compensate for this time lag, females are capable of storing spermatozoa in their reproductive tracts until the eggs are ready to be fertilized. In avian species, simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storage tubules (SSTs) are located between the vagina and uterus as sperm storage sites. Spermatozoa, once ejaculated, migrate to and are thereafter stored in the lumen of the SSTs without loss of fertilizing capacity for up to 15 weeks at a body temperature of 41 °C. This is astonishing, because terminally differentiated cells that lack new protein synthesis are still capable of being functional for a long period at a high temperature; however, the actual mechanism has been an enigma for more than half a century. In this chapter, we will first describe the physiological importance and adoptive benefits of sperm storage in the female genital tract for successful fertilization in animals, and next, we will describe our recent findings in birds with regard to the specific mechanism of sperm uptake into the SST, sperm maintenance within it, and controlled release from it.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 26%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 15 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 12%
Psychology 3 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 15 36%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2023.
All research outputs
#14,883,321
of 24,935,186 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#2,068
of 5,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,155
of 432,121 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#179
of 492 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,935,186 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,248 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 432,121 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 492 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.