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Avian Reproduction

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 4: Development and Preservation of Avian Sperm
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Development and Preservation of Avian Sperm
Chapter number 4
Book title
Avian Reproduction
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-3975-1_4
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-9-81-103974-4, 978-9-81-103975-1
Authors

Atsushi Asano, Atsushi Tajima

Abstract

Terminally differentiated avian sperm consist of a head which male genetic material locates and flagellum that provides the motive force to propel them towards the fertilization site. The apical end of the sperm head accommodates a secretory vesicle, called an acrosome, that undergoes acrosome reaction releasing proteolytic content to penetrate the peri-vitelline membrane of an egg. Transcriptionally and translationally inactive, sperm need to rely on these distinct compartments in which different functions are preassembled, in order to achieve the goal of "fertilization". How are these complex structures with high functionality formed? Spermatogenesis is divided into an early stage in which diploid spermatogonia is proliferated into round spermatids thorough mitotic and meiotic divisions, and a late stage in which round spermatids are transformed into sperm though nuclear condensation and elongation of the sperm head, and formation of accessory structures. Recently, it was reported in aves that morphologically differentiated sperm undergo post-testicular maturation during passage through the male genital tract, suggesting that a similar system to mammals might be involved in the acquisition of fertilizing ability in avian sperm. Investigation for mechanisms underlying how sperm regulate their functions which are necessary to achieve fertilization is important for developing reproductive biotechnology in aves, because cryopreservation of poultry sperm is still not reliable for use in commercial production or for the preservation of genetic resources. In this review, we firstly provide an update on avian spermatogenesis, and then discuss the uniqueness of structure and functions of avian sperm, highlighting differences from mammalian sperm. Lastly, we discuss the molecular mechanism and current techniques of cryopreservation for avian sperm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2017.
All research outputs
#14,366,228
of 23,005,189 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#2,103
of 4,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,369
of 421,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#192
of 490 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,005,189 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 490 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.