↓ Skip to main content

Respiratory System Diseases

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 207: Public Perception of the Risks Associated with Infectious Diseases in Poland: Ebola and Influenza and Their Impact on the Attitude to Vaccination
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Chapter title
Public Perception of the Risks Associated with Infectious Diseases in Poland: Ebola and Influenza and Their Impact on the Attitude to Vaccination
Chapter number 207
Book title
Respiratory System Diseases
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/5584_2016_207
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-959497-2, 978-3-31-959498-9
Authors

Ernest Kuchar, Kamila Ludwikowska, Dominik Marciniak, Leszek Szenborn, Aneta Nitsch-Osuch, Stan L. Block,, Teresa Jackowska, Ryszard Konior, Diego DʼAgostino, Igor Smolenov, Daniela Toneatto, Jo Anne Welsch

Abstract

While the Ebola outbreak in 2014 was strongly highlighted in mainstream media and perceived as a threat to public health in Poland, influenza was regarded as a triviality and the vaccination coverage was low. In the present study, by analyzing feedback from an on-line questionnaire (from November 2014 to January 2015) we assessed the knowledge concerning Ebola and influenza together with attitudes to immunization of 544 respondents (45% medical staff). The findings were that 92.6% of respondents declared readiness to vaccination before traveling to endemic regions if a vaccine against Ebola would have existed, but adverse reactions, high costs, and low effectiveness would adversely affect that decision. While 84.2% of respondents declared awareness of influenza attributing significantly to the cause of death, only 65.4% considered influenza as an actual danger for people in Poland and 46.7% thought that Poland was not an endemic region for influenza. Nearly 23% declared that they were already vaccinated against influenza. The majority of respondents (67.5%) were not going to be vaccinated. We conclude that awareness of risk related to infectious diseases is an important determinant when deciding whether to vaccinate. However, negative information about the vaccine has some bearing on the decision to get vaccinated.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 19%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 14 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,172,538
of 11,465,445 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#2,226
of 3,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,602
of 258,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,465,445 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,061 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,545 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.