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Behavioural coordination of dogs in a cooperative problem-solving task with a conspecific and a human partner

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
151 Mendeley
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Title
Behavioural coordination of dogs in a cooperative problem-solving task with a conspecific and a human partner
Published in
Animal Cognition, September 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10071-013-0676-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ljerka Ostojić, Nicola S. Clayton

Abstract

The process of domestication has arguably provided dogs (Canis familiaris) with decreased emotional reactivity (reduced fear and aggression) and increased socio-cognitive skills adaptive for living with humans. It has been suggested that dogs are uniquely equipped with abilities that have been identified as crucial in cooperative problem-solving, namely social tolerance and the ability to attend to other individuals' behaviour. Accordingly, dogs might be hypothesised to perform well in tasks in which they have to work together with a human partner. Recently, researchers have found that dogs successfully solved a simple cooperative task with another dog. Due to the simplicity of the task, this study was, however, unable to provide clear evidence as to whether the dogs' successful performance was based on the cognitive ability of behavioural coordination, namely the capacity to link task requirements to the necessity of adjusting one's actions to the partner's behaviour. Here, we tested dogs with the most commonly used cooperative task, appropriate to test behavioural coordination. In addition, we paired dogs with both a conspecific and a human partner. Although dogs had difficulties in inhibiting the necessary action when required to wait for their partner, they successfully attended to the two cues that predicted a successful outcome, namely their partner's behaviour and the incremental movement of rewards towards themselves. This behavioural coordination was shown with both a conspecific and a human partner, in line with the recent findings suggesting that dogs exhibit highly developed socio-cognitive skills in interactions with both humans and other dogs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Hungary 2 1%
Italy 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 140 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 22%
Student > Master 31 21%
Researcher 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 3%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 21 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 42%
Psychology 29 19%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 4%
Computer Science 4 3%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 33 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2020.
All research outputs
#858,313
of 17,663,872 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#224
of 1,221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,209
of 170,678 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#2
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,663,872 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,221 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 170,678 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 8 of them.