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Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer

Overview of attention for book
Cover of 'Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer'

Table of Contents

  1. Altmetric Badge
    Book Overview
  2. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 1 Sunlight, UV-radiation, vitamin D and skin cancer: how much sunlight do we need?
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    Chapter 2 Solar ultraviolet irradiance and cancer incidence and mortality.
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    Chapter 3 Vitamin D status and cancer incidence and mortality.
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    Chapter 4 Sun exposure and cancer survival in Norway: changes in the risk of death with season of diagnosis and latitude.
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    Chapter 5 Optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels for multiple health outcomes.
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    Chapter 6 Ultraviolet exposure scenarios: risks of erythema from recommendations on cutaneous vitamin D synthesis.
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    Chapter 7 At What Time Should One Go Out in the Sun?
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    Chapter 8 Epidemiology of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer—The Role of Sunlight
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    Chapter 9 Ultraviolet radiation and malignant melanoma.
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    Chapter 10 Solar UV exposure and mortality from skin tumors.
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    Chapter 11 Health Initiatives for the Prevention of Skin Cancer
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    Chapter 12 Sunscreens.
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    Chapter 13 UV damage and DNA repair in malignant melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
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    Chapter 14 Role of viruses in the development of squamous cell cancer and melanoma.
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    Chapter 15 Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers and the immune system.
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    Chapter 16 Solar UV-radiation, vitamin D and skin cancer surveillance in organ transplant recipients (OTRs).
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    Chapter 17 Histology of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
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    Chapter 18 Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer
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    Chapter 19 Molecular biology of basal and squamous cell carcinomas.
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    Chapter 20 Molecular biology of malignant melanoma.
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    Chapter 21 P53 protein and pathogenesis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
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    Chapter 22 Apoptosis and pathogenesis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  24. Altmetric Badge
    Chapter 23 Treatment of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
Attention for Chapter 13: UV damage and DNA repair in malignant melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
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Chapter title
UV damage and DNA repair in malignant melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
Chapter number 13
Book title
Sunlight, Vitamin D and Skin Cancer
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, March 2008
DOI 10.1007/978-0-387-77574-6_13
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-0-387-77573-9, 978-0-387-77574-6
Authors

Rass K, Reichrath J, Knuth Rass, Jörg Reichrath, Rass, Knuth, Reichrath, Jörg

Editors

Jörg Reichrath

Abstract

Exposition of the skin with solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) is the main cause of skin cancer development. The consistently increasing incidences of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumors are believed to be at least in part associated with recreational sun exposure. Epidemiological data indicate that excessive or cumulative sunlight exposition takes place years and decades before the resulting malignancies arise. The most important defense mechanisms that protect human skin against UV radiation involve melanin synthesis and active repair mechanisms. DNA is the major target of direct or indirect UV-induced cellular damage. Low pigmentation capacity in white Caucasians and rare congenital defects in DNA repair are mainly responsible for protection failures. The important function of nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) to protect against skin cancer becomes obvious by the rare genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum, in which diverse NER genes are mutated. In animal models, it has been demonstrated that UVB is more effective to induce skin cancer than UVA. UV-induced DNA photoproducts are able to cause specific mutations (UV-signature) in susceptible genes for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In SCC development, UV-signature mutations in the p513 tumor suppressor gene are the most common event, as precancerous lesions reveal approximately 80% and SCCs > 90% UV-specific p53 mutations. Mutations in Hedgehog pathway related genes, especially PTCH1, are well known to represent the most significant pathogenic event in BCC. However, specific UV-induced mutations can be found only in approximately 50% of sporadic BCCs. Thus, cumulative UVB radiation can not be considered to be the single etiologic risk factor for BCC development. During the last decades, experimental animal models, including genetically engineered mice, the Xiphophorus hybrid fish, the south american oppossum and human skin xenografts, have further elucidated the important role of the DNA repair system in the multi-step process of UV-induced melanomagenesis. An increasing body of evidence now indicates that nucleotide excision repair is not the only DNA repair pathway that is involved in UV-induced tumorigenesis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. An interesting new perspective in DNA damage and repair research lies in the participation of mammalian mismatch repair (MMR) in UV damage correction. As MMR enzyme hMSH2 displays a p53 target gene, is induced by UVB radiation and is involved in NER pathways, studies have now been initiated to elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological role of MMR in malignant melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer development.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 X user who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 185 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Colombia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Unknown 175 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 19%
Student > Bachelor 31 17%
Researcher 29 16%
Student > Master 19 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 21 11%
Unknown 39 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 15%
Chemistry 10 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 3%
Other 22 12%
Unknown 45 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2014.
All research outputs
#15,306,972
of 22,765,347 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#2,494
of 4,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,228
of 81,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,765,347 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,928 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 81,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.