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Assessing high-impact spots of climate change: spatial yield simulations with Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) model

Overview of attention for article published in Mitigation & Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
116 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing high-impact spots of climate change: spatial yield simulations with Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) model
Published in
Mitigation & Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11027-015-9696-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anton Eitzinger, Peter Läderach, Beatriz Rodriguez, Myles Fisher, Stephen Beebe, Kai Sonder, Axel Schmidt

Abstract

Drybeans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are an important subsistence crop in Central America. Future climate change may threaten drybean production and jeopardize smallholder farmers' food security. We estimated yield changes in drybeans due to changing climate in these countries using downscaled data from global circulation models (GCMs) in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. We generated daily weather data, which we used in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) drybean submodel. We compared different cultivars, soils, and fertilizer options in three planting seasons. We analyzed the simulated yields to spatially classify high-impact spots of climate change across the four countries. The results show a corridor of reduced yields from Lake Nicaragua to central Honduras (10-38 % decrease). Yields increased in the Guatemalan highlands, towards the Atlantic coast, and in southern Nicaragua (10-41 % increase). Some farmers will be able to adapt to climate change, but others will have to change crops, which will require external support. Research institutions will need to devise technologies that allow farmers to adapt and provide policy makers with feasible strategies to implement them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 2%
Colombia 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 109 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 22%
Student > Master 23 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 23 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 34%
Environmental Science 17 15%
Engineering 9 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 7%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 31 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,435,498
of 21,175,128 outputs
Outputs from Mitigation & Adaptation Strategies for Global Change
#166
of 630 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,135
of 374,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mitigation & Adaptation Strategies for Global Change
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,175,128 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 630 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,899 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.