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A meta-analysis of pesticide loss in runoff under conventional tillage and no-till management

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, January 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 2,164)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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53 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
A meta-analysis of pesticide loss in runoff under conventional tillage and no-till management
Published in
Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10661-017-6441-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Elias, Lixin Wang, Pierre-Andre Jacinthe

Abstract

Global agricultural intensification has led to increased pesticide use (37-fold from 1960 to 2005) and soil erosion (14% since 2000). Conservation tillage, including no-till (NT), has been proposed as an alternative to conventional plow till (PT) to mitigate soil erosion, but past studies have reported mixed results on the effect of conservation tillage on pesticide loss. To explore the underlying factors of these differences, a meta-analysis was conducted using published data on pesticide concentration and load in agricultural runoff from NT and PT fields. Peer-reviewed articles (1985-2016) were compiled to build a database for analysis. Contrary to expectations, results showed greater concentration of atrazine, cyanazine, dicamba, and simazine in runoff from NT than PT fields. Further, we observed greater load of dicamba and metribuzin, but reduced load of alachlor from NT fields. Overall, the concentration and the load of pesticides were greater in runoff from NT fields, especially pesticides with high solubility and low affinity for solids. Thus, NT farming affects soil properties that control pesticide retention and interactions with soils, and ultimately their mobility in the environment. Future research is needed for a more complete understanding of pesticide-soil interactions in NT systems. This research could inform the selection of pesticides by farmers and improve the predictive power of pesticide transport models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 33%
Environmental Science 10 19%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 15 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2018.
All research outputs
#754,850
of 19,527,185 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
#22
of 2,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,905
of 428,530 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
#1
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,527,185 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,164 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 428,530 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.