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Differences in late-life loneliness: a comparison between Turkish and native-born older adults in Germany

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Ageing, March 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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70 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Differences in late-life loneliness: a comparison between Turkish and native-born older adults in Germany
Published in
European Journal of Ageing, March 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10433-013-0267-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tineke Fokkema, Robert Naderi

Abstract

The aim of this study was (1) to examine whether Turkish older migrants are indeed-as is often claimed without solid scientific evidence-lonelier than their peers with no migration background and (2) to determine the factors that account for the differences in loneliness between them. We analysed data of adults aged 50-79 from the first wave of the German Generations and Gender Survey and a supplementary survey of Turkish nationals in Germany (N = 3,248 born in Germany and N = 494 born in Turkey). Differences in degree of loneliness between Turkish and native-born older adults were determined by the six-item Loneliness Scale of de Jong Gierveld. To identify the specific factors contributing to these loneliness differences, a series of multivariate regression analyses were conducted, examining the impact of two groups of risk factors (poor health and low socioeconomic status) and two groups of protective factors (social embeddedness in the family and informal support exchanges) on loneliness. Results showed that feelings of loneliness are indeed more prevalent among older adults of Turkish origin than their German counterparts, which is entirely attributable to their lower socioeconomic status and poorer health. Living with a partner or children, frequent contacts with non-coresident children, emotional support exchange and looking after grandchildren-though important factors to prevent loneliness at the individual level-did not specifically protect Turkish older adults from loneliness, or did so rarely. These findings not only indicate new and challenging directions for further research but also raise questions about the effectiveness of the most common loneliness interventions, which focus on improving number and quality of social relationships.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Luxembourg 1 1%
Unknown 68 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Master 8 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 24 34%
Psychology 16 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 17 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,469,573
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Ageing
#87
of 241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,488
of 160,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Ageing
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 241 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.